What is a Trust?

A trust is a legally binding arrangement where an individual or group (settlor) delegates the management of money or assets to another person or an organisation (the trustees), who in turn passes them to a person/people (beneficiaries). Here’s more information on trusts, why people set them up and the sort of trust funds available in the UK…

When people set up a trust
The money or assets involved in a trust are usually designated to support a person who can’t manage money, such as a child or a person with limited mental capacity or a learning disability.
A trust may also be used in reverse. This is when your own money is used to look after you if you’re unable to look after yourself due to an illness or disability.

The costs of setting up a trust
As trusts can be complex, they should really be set up with professional help to avoid any costly mistakes. Usually, setting up a trust costs around £1,000, but if you’re setting up a trust for a disabled child there are a number of charities, such as Mencap, offering contribution schemes to assist with the financial aspect.

Reasons for setting up a trust
There are a number of different reasons why families, groups and organisations may set up a trust, some of which include:

  • Protect those who are unable to control their spending
  • Protect family assets and keep them in the family
  • Safeguard assets against bankruptcy
  • If the beneficiary is a child or someone with a learning disability (including adults)
  • A company distributing pensions over the duration of an individual’s employment.

There are many different types of trusts, although bare or absolute trusts are the most popular type of trust that people can set up in the UK. The settlor transfers money or assets to the trust for the trustees to look after and, when the beneficiary turns 18 years old, they receive all the assets and money from the trust.

An interest in possession trust involves the trustees transferring all trust capital to the beneficiary for a fixed period of time – usually for the rest of their life. The beneficiary is then known as a ‘life tenant’ and the trust is known as a ‘life interest trust.’ The interest in possession will end when the life tenant dies and the ‘capital beneficiaries’ (usually the children when the income beneficiary spouse dies) inherit the capital of the trust.

To find out more about Trusts, and help in deciding which is best for your own circumstances, give us a ring on 01243 216900 or e-mail us at info@legalmatters.co.uk.

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