Monthly Archives: May 2019

Disagreements during Probate

Dealing with disagreement between executors in the administration of probate

The administration of the estate of a loved one can be a difficult job.

There are many decisions to be made at a time when people may be feeling overwhelmed and fraught. It is not uncommon for executors to fall out during this time, which is the last thing the deceased would have wanted.

People may feel that the other executor(s) are not acting in the most beneficial way, or that they are taking over or not sharing information.

Some of the administration tasks and problems that can arise

One of the main jobs after someone’s death is often to clear their property, dispose of their personal effects and put the house up for sale. Selling a home frequently causes friction, even in ordinary circumstances, and when it closely follows a death then emotions can run high.

There are also choices to be made over payments of expenses, who should be allowed to buy assets such as property or valuables, agreeing on valuations and closing or moving bank accounts. One executor may want to hold on to any property until the market improves, while another may want to sell straight away.

The process itself always takes a long time, which can be a source of frustration.

Maintaining a good relationship between executors

One of the key ways to maintain a good relationship between executors is to communicate as much as possible. If something has caused a delay, make sure everyone knows why and that it is unavoidable. If different valuations have been received, make sure the situation is talked through and try and take everyone’s point of view into account.

Stepping aside as an executor

If an executor does not want to act, it is possible to stand down before administration begins. They can either renounce the role permanently or ask for their power to be reserved, which could allow them to apply to court to become an executor at a later date.

If the relationship between executors breaks down completely, it is possible for one of them to apply to the court to have another removed, which the court might do if it believes this is in the best interests of the estate. There is then the option for a new appointment to be made.

Avoiding conflict in estate administration

It is possible to request a professional executor when drawing up your Will. This means that an expert probate lawyer will act as your executor. The advantage of this is that they are experienced in dealing with probate and will also act impartially. It can minimise delay and reassure everyone involved that the estate’s best interests are being observed.

To talk to one of our probate specialists, call legalmatters on 01243 216900 or email us at info@legalmatters.co.uk.

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Are you owed a refund after setting up a Lasting Power of Attorney?

Nearly two million people are due a refund after the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) overcharged for registering a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA).

An LPA gives someone the right to manage your affairs after you become incapable of doing so. You can execute an LPA in respect of your health and welfare and/or in respect of your property and financial affairs.

The Ministry of Justice has announced that the OPG overcharged those who registered an LPA between 1 April 2013 and 31 March 2017, and that they are entitled to a refund.

So far only 200,000 claims have been made out of 1.8 million who are qualified to do so.

Making a claim

Either a donor or an attorney can make the claim. They will need to supply the donor’s bank details, as the payment will be made to the donor. A copy of the LPA should also be included.

The claim form can be accessed via the government information page https://www.gov.uk/power-of-attorney-refund. In some cases, including where the donor does not have a bank account or the applicant is a court-appointed deputy, the claim will need to be made by phone by calling the helpline on 0300 456 0300, option 6. The deadline for claims is 1 February 2021.

How much will be refunded?

The amount of the refund will depend on when the LPA was registered, as fees paid differed over the time period in question.

Date Fee Paid                      Refund
April to Sept 2013                 £54
Oct 2013 to March 2014      £34
April 2014 to March 2015    £37
April 2015 to March 2016    £38
April 2016 to March 2017    £45

A claim can be made for each LPA registered. Interest will also be paid at a rate of 0.5 percent.

Who needs an LPA?

It is advisable for everyone to take the time to make an LPA, so that in the event they become unable to manage their affairs, either through illness, injury or incapacity, their chosen attorney can step in to help.

In the absence of an LPA, application would need to be made to the court, which could be an expensive and time-consuming process. This could also mean that you might not have your first choice of attorney acting for you.

You can execute an LPA, then keep it until such time as it is needed, at which point it is registered with the OPG.

If you would like to talk to one of our expert lawyers about drawing up an LPA, call legalmatters on 01243 216900 or email us at info@legalmatters.co.uk.

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Going on holiday

Making a Will before you go on holiday

While no-one really wants another task to do before they go away on holiday, it really is a good idea to make sure you have a valid Will in place before you travel.

Taking a trip will always involve a small risk, and many people take out insurance just in case something happens. Think of a Will in the same way; it probably won’t be needed, but once you have it in place, you can forget about it and enjoy your break.

Increased risk level on holiday

When we’re away, we often try activities we wouldn’t at home, and they may well be things we’re not proficient at. While there is rarely a problem, very occasionally things can go wrong.

Some countries have lower road safety levels than the UK, meaning a higher risk of an accident while travelling. Some places face regular natural disasters such as flooding, subsidence, earthquakes or tsunamis.

There are diseases in some countries that can on occasion be fatal or a risk of injury or poisoning from the local wildlife, and medical care might be of a lower standard than you would wish.

While these are not common occurrences, insurance companies understand that the risks do exist. It makes sense to put a Will in place, in the same way that we might arrange an insurance policy.

Why you should make sure you have a Will

If you die intestate, ie. without a valid Will in place, your money and assets such as your home and personal possessions will pass under the Rules of Intestacy, to particular members of your family. You may have wished to leave your money elsewhere, or in different proportions, but without a Will, no-one will be able to carry out your wishes.

You can also include requests about your funeral, what should happen if you die overseas and details regarding care of any minor children if you have them. This can cover not only who you would like to become their legal guardian, but also financial provision.

It is always a good idea to have a Will in place, even if you aren’t planning any travelling. This applies to every age group, not just older generations. If you have any assets, then it makes sense to make your wishes clear, so that they can go to those you choose.

While no-one enjoys thinking about writing their Will, once it is in place there is usually a sense of relief, knowing that your wishes have been recorded and will be carried out should anything happen to you. In the meantime you are free to relax and enjoy life, including any trips you have planned.

If you would like to talk to someone about writing your Will, speak to one of our team at legalmatters on 01243 216900 or email us at info@legalmatters.co.uk.

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Why you shouldn’t try and draft your own Power of Attorney

Giving someone the power to deal with your affairs can be a good idea, but if the document isn’t drafted carefully it can lead to expensive financial and administrative problems.

A Lasting Power of Attorney is the document which gives someone the authority to deal with financial affairs on behalf of another. It is often signed by older people in anticipation of the time when they may become unable to deal with matters by themselves. It must be executed while the donor is still mentally capable of understanding the authorisation they are giving.

Problems can arise if the document isn’t carefully drafted, clearly and unambiguously setting out exactly what the donor wants the attorney to do for them. There are many decisions to be made, including the following:

How many attorneys?

More than one attorney can be appointed. The document needs to state whether they are able to act jointly and severally or just jointly. If they are only able to act jointly, then every attorney will need to be a party to each individual transaction, for example signing a cheque or authorising a financial transaction.

There is also the option to name replacement attorneys who would step in if one of the original attorneys died. Again, their role will depend on whether the original attorneys were acting jointly or jointly and severally. If the original attorneys had to act jointly, then on the death of any one of them, all of them would be forced to stand down and the replacement(s) would step in.

When can the Power of Attorney be used?

The donor can choose to allow the Power of Attorney to be used before they become incapacitated, for example, to facilitate dealing with banks where mobility is an issue. Alternatively, they may want to manage their own affairs until such time as they are mentally unable to.

Restrictions

The Power of Attorney can cover all financial affairs, or it can contain restrictions, for example, not permitting sale of a house or large cash gifts. It is important that any restrictions are clearly drafted, with no ambiguity.

Other Powers of Attorney

The donor may also have drawn up a personal welfare Power of Attorney to deal with health and welfare matters. If different attorneys are named on that document, financial attorneys may need to cooperate with them to find the best way forward for the donor.

Having a Power of Attorney document professionally drafted by experts is well worth the expense. If a document contains errors or is poorly worded it could end up being contested or being declared invalid. In that case, any legal action or application to the Court of Protection to appoint a deputy would be expensive and could result in the donor’s affairs not being administered as they would have chosen.

If you would like to speak to a lawyer who specialises in drawing up Powers of Attorney, ring us on 01243 216900 or email us at info@legalmatters.co.uk.

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